Nature Trails Brochure Flipbook

NATURE TRAILS OF SURREY

Contents 1 BEAR CREEK PARK.................................................... 4 2 BLACKIE SPIT PARK................................................... 5 3 BOSE FOREST PARK.................................................. 6 4 CRESCENT PARK........................................................ 7 5 ELGIN HERITAGE PARK............................................. 8 6 FLEETWOOD PARK.................................................... 9 7 GODWIN FARM BIODIVERSITY PRESERVE PARK... 10 8 GREENTIMBERS URBAN FOREST PARK................11 9 SURREY NATURE CENTRE AT GREENTIMBERS.. 12 10 HAZELNUT MEADOWS COMMUNITY PARK........ 13 11 HI-KNOLL PARK........................................................ 14 12 INVERGARRY PARK................................................. 15 13 MUD BAY PARK........................................................ 16 14 REDWOOD PARK...................................................... 17 15 SEMIAHMOOTRAIL................................................. 18 16 SUNNYSIDE ACRES URBAN FOREST PARK......... 19 17 SURREY LAKE PARK................................................ 20

F r a s e r R i v e r

HWY 17

28

12

108 AVE GROSVENOR

18

GUILDFORD

SCOTT

104 AVE

27

8

19

WHALLEY

HWY 1

9

96 AVE

HWY 17

7

21

88 AVE

88 AVE

FRASER HWY

1

DVL B EGROEG GNIK

HARVIE

80 AVE

TS 0 21

TS 251

FLEETWOOD

6

NEWTON

TS 6 91

22

72 AVE

20

17

TS 861

10

64 AVE

64 AVE

3

CLOVERDALE

HWY 10

DELTA

11

26

13

TS 671

M u d B a y

TS 251

SOUTH SURREY

5

2

15

TS 041

LANGLEY

23

TS 8 61 HWY 99

4

24 AVE

24 AVE

16

14

24

TS 8 21

16 AVE

WHITE ROCK

TS 671

25

10 AVE

8 AVE

S e m i a h m o o B a y

ADDITIONAL PARKS OF INTEREST 18 ROYAL KWANTLEN PARK 19 ROBSON PARK 20 COUGAR CREEK PARK 21 PORT KELLS PARK 22 CLAYTON PARK

Scale

0

2.5

5km

Featured parks

Information Dog off-leash area

Additional parks of interest

Parking

Trail Rugged trail Universal access trail River/creek Bridge Environmentally Sensitive Area Stairs

23 CRESCENT BEACH 24 DOGWOOD PARK 25 KWOMAIS POINT PARK

Washroom

Picnic shelter

Picnic table(s)

LOCATIONS NOT MANAGED BY SURREY PARKS 26 SERPENTINEWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA (DUCKS UNLIMITED) 27 TYNEHEAD REGIONAL PARK (METRO VANCOUVER) 28 SURREY BEND REGIONAL PARK (METRO VANCOUVER)

Playground

Spray park

4

Surrey's Parks Celebrate the diversity of Surrey Parks! Whether it’s a walk in the woods or along a shoreline, nature trails are a great way to experience nature in the city. Some of Surrey’s most treasured natural areas are highlighted here. Help us protect and care for these special places and the wildlife that live here. Animals take refuge, search for food, and build nests just off the trails. Please stay on trails and keep your dogs on-leash to prevent disturbing wildlife and sensitive habitats. Get ready, get set, explore! surrey.ca/parks | stewardship@surrey.ca

Surrey Parks

acres of parkland cres of parkland

species of fish and wildlife

dog off-leash areas l

2

Bear Creek Park

Bear Creek Park is an ideal spot for family adventures or individual exploring. There’s something for everyone, which makes it one of Surrey’s most popular parks! Many different habitats meet here. Look high in the treetops to spot owls and eagles, or look down from the bridges to the streams below to spot ducks and salmon. Trails wind through meadows and forests, and across two salmon-bearing streams: Bear Creek and King Creek. Salmon begin their lives here as pea- sized eggs, travel to the ocean, and return as adults to spawn. During October and November you may see spawning Chum, Coho, and Chinook salmon. The stream also supports a diverse community of plants and animals including aquatic insects, frogs and salamanders. Look for interpretive signs along the trail to learn more. Bear Creek Park offers opportunities for many other outdoor activities. Walk through the beautiful gardens and awaken your senses in the sensory garden. You'll also find sports fields, a playground, a running track, picnic areas and shelters, an outdoor swimming pool, and a spray park – a family favourite on a hot day. The Surrey Arts Centre is also just steps away!

13750 – 88 Avenue

Surrey Arts Centre

88 AVE

88 AVE

139 ST

LAUDER

139A ST

138A ST

K i n g C r e e k

Q u i b b l e C r

140 ST

Outdoor Pool

140A ST

86A AVE

86 AVE

B e a r C r e e k

KING GEORGE BLVD

Gardens

Sports Fields

85 AVE

Miniature Train

141 ST

Skate Park & Climbing Wall

84 AVE

K i n g C r e e k

84 AVE

83A AVE

135A ST

B e a r C r e e k

82 AVE

Scale 0

B E A R C R D R 1 4 0 A S T

100

200m

H u n t C r e e k

81A AVE

KING GEORGE BLVD

81 AVE

136A ST

138 ST

140 ST

1 3 9 A S T

1 3 8 A S T

80B AVE

6

Blackie Spit Park Visit Blackie Spit Park to enjoy unique views of Boundary Bay and the North Shore Mountains. The park is located at the tip of Crescent Beach where a sandspit extends into Mud Bay. Trails lead you through meadows, along shorelines, and along the dyke to Dunsmuir Community Gardens. Long before settlers arrived, Indigenous Coast Salish people collected food, rested, and repaired tools here. Later, it was the site of a prosperous oyster company. Many of the leftover pilings have a new purpose – providing perches and homes for birds. Bring your binoculars, a field guide, and a sense of adventure – who knows what you might see! Twice a year, Blackie Spit Park is a rest stop for over 300 species of migratory birds moving between southern wintering sites and northern summer breeding grounds. Year-round, a variety of birds bring sights and sounds; listen for Red-winged Blackbirds calling out or spot a hummingbird taking a pause in the treetops. If you’re lucky, you might even spot harbour seals or other marine mammals in the water. With so much important bird habitat, parts of the park are designated as Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESA). Did you know that many birds nest on the ground? Killdeer and Savannah Sparrows are just two examples of birds whose clutches (groups of eggs) are vulnerable to disturbance. Please take care when you visit the ESA and always stay on trails. Dogs and bikes are not permitted in these areas. As an alternative, Blackie Spit Park has two off-leash areas for your furry friends to enjoy!

3136 McBride Avenue

B o u n d a r y B a y

N i c o m e k l R i v e r

Dog Off-Leash Swimming Beach

Wickson Point

Crescent Beach Pier

Swim & Sail Clubs

WICKSONRD

Meadow

McBRIDE AVE

Environmentally Sensitive Area No Dogs • No Bikes

GARDINER ST

GILLEY ST

BURLINGTON NORTHERN RAILWAY

Dunsmuir Community Gardens

AGAR ST

Meadow

KIDD RD

DUNSMUIR RD

BEECHER ST

C R E S C E N T R D

GORDON AVE

SULLIVAN ST

Scale

0

100

200m

BEECHER ST

8

B o u n d a r y B

Bose Forest Park Opened in 2017, Bose Forest Park is one of Surrey’s newest parks. Come walk the trails, have a picnic, and check out the nature-themed playground. In the 1800s when settlers were starting their farms and clearing the land, the Bose family chose to leave part of their property forested. They used it for recreation and welcomed the community to do the same. They knew this area was something special – and it is. This diverse forest is full of life. Spot some of our treasured coastal trees – Douglas-fir, Western redcedar, and bigleaf maple – and take your best guess at how old they are. Some are over 80 years old! Don’t forget to stop at the wildlife trees; these decaying trees help support the forest and are some of the best places to spot woodpeckers and owls. Finally, walk the boardwalk over rare swamp habitat and discover why swamps are sensitive ecosystems in BC.

6203 – 164 Street

6 2 A A V E

6 3 A V E

0 100m 50

6 2 A V E

Scale

164 ST

61A AVE

1 6 3 B S T

163A ST

Swamp

163 ST

61A AVE

10

Greenway

Crescent Park With over 120 acres, Crescent Park is one of Surrey’s largest parks. Walk through a forest that transitions from evergreen to deciduous trees (those that drop their leaves), through meadows, and past a pond. A variety of birds and other wildlife live here; eagles, owls, frogs and coyotes are just some of the creatures you might see. Did you know that Crescent Park was once a logging camp? It was part of a corridor used to transport timber to the Nicomekl River. “Nurse stumps” scattered throughout the park are remnants of this history. These stumps are given this name because they help keep the forest healthy, and provide habitat for plants and animals. Crescent Park has one of the most extensive trail networks in Surrey. The loop around the pond is wide and compact, while trails through the forest offer a variety of slopes and surfaces. A loop made up of the outermost trails around Crescent Park is approximately 3.8 km long with many options for shorter loops. Relax and enjoy the park’s trails, open fields, picnic tables and shelters. Other amenities include two baseball diamonds, large multi-purpose fields and two playgrounds.

2600 block 132 Street or 129 Street off Crescent Road

129 ST

C R E S C E N T R D

28 AVE

128 ST

26B AVE

Pond

26 AVE

26 AVE

Sports Fields

26 AVE

128A ST

25 AVE

Event Parking Only

Tennis Courts

Crescent Park Elementary School

132 ST

128 ST

24 AVE

24 AVE

1 2 9 A S T

Scale 0

130 ST

100

200m

129B ST

Photo credit Olivia Ann Photography

12

Elgin Heritage Park Located on the banks of the Nicomekl River, Elgin Heritage Park is a natural and historical treasure. The park is an important place for migratory birds and is the site where the Stewart family once operated a thriving farm as pioneers in Surrey. The park is located along the Pacific Flyway, an aerial “highway” for migrating birds. Thousands of birds visit Elgin Heritage Park each spring and fall, feasting and resting on the banks of the Nicomekl River as they break from their travels. The water level changes with the tides twice a day because the river is so close to the ocean; otters, seals, and a variety of shorebirds visit as a result. The river was historically used as a transportation route by Indigenous people and settlers alike; today you may see kayakers enjoying a paddle on the river. Who else might you see? Owls! Catch a glimpse of a Barn Owl near the mini-barn built especially for them. Search high in the trees for signs of Great Horned Owls who have also been known to frequent the park. Don’t forget your binoculars! Trails wind through marsh, forest, and meadow; across boardwalks; along the river; and past the Historic Stewart Farm. The trails at Elgin Heritage Park are primarily wide, gravel trails. Please note that the east part of the dyke walkway is shared with the Nico-Wynd golf course; for your safety please observe the signage.

13601 Crescent Road

N I C O W Y N D D R

0 100 200m

C R E S C E N T R D

Trail

continues to Elgin Road

35A AVE

Scale

35 AVE

Marsh

Historic

Stewart Farm

Marina

Meadow

N i c o m e k l R i v e r

CRESCENT RD

136 ST

Marsh

Meadow

14

Fleetwood Park Fleetwood Park offers visitors a combination of quiet walks through an urban forest, peaceful reflection within the gardens, a chance to cool down in a spray park, and more. This park is named after Lance Corporal Arthur Thomas (Tom) Fleetwood, an early settler of the region. After Tom died in WWI, his sister Edith petitioned a request to name the community after him. Years after the charter was successfully granted, Fleetwood Park opened and the name was a natural fit. Most of the nature trails can be found in the southern part of the park, where much of the forest was set aside as an urban forest through referendum. Listen for the hammering of the Pileated Woodpecker, watch for fish in Fleetwood Creek (from the bridges of course!) and marvel at the bigleaf maples covered in moss and licorice ferns. If you’ve never explored the southern part of the park, the 1.8-km loop trail is a great place to start, good for trail running or dog walking. This area is important habitat for wildlife; stay on the trail and keep your dog on-leash. If you are feeling a little more adventurous, explore the narrow and rugged trail that runs through the inner part of the forest.

15802 – 80 Avenue

1 5 9 S T

158 ST

160 ST

80 AVE

80 AVE

Fleetwood Park Secondary School

Gardens

79A AVE

Sports Fields

Beach Volleyball Courts

Tennis Courts

78A AVE

78 AVE

7 7 B A V E

77A AVE

157 ST

156A ST

F l e e t w o o d C r

77 AVE

160 ST

77 AVE

7 6 A A V E

76A AVE

76 AVE

Fleetwood Substation

Scale

0

100

200m

16

Godwin Farm Biodiversity Preserve Opened in 2017, this park was a gift from the Godwin family who donated 26 acres of their farm property to the City of Surrey through Canada’s Ecological Gifts Program. The land is rich in biodiversity and heritage, and they wanted to share it with you. Tom and Elaine Godwin first purchased this land in 1969 when much of this part of Surrey was a “stump farm” – named for the large stumps remaining after logging. The family built and operated a farm, tended the pasture fields, restored a salmon stream, planted over 10,000 trees, and constructed a pond. For 45 years the Godwins put a lot of care and attention into this land – environmental stewardship in action! The park’s trails will take you past a pond, through a grove of towering redwood trees, around a meadow, and past an orchard. Enjoy a small taste of fruit from the remaining orchard. Another sight to see is the 175-foot tall Douglas-fir tree, a designated Heritage Tree that is over 180 years old. Can you imagine what this park would have looked like 200 years ago? A Biodiversity Preserve is an area preserved and protected for its variety of plants, animals, and habitats; and the connections between them. Herons, owls, coyotes, and salmon are just a few of the animals that visit the park. To help protect wildlife and habitat, dogs are not permitted in the park.

9016 – 164 Street

0 100m 50

E C r e e k

Scale

Meadow

Orchard

Pond

K u r t e n a c k e r C r e e k

G o d w i n C r e e k

E C r e e k

Meadow

164 ST

90 AVE

18

Green Timbers Urban Forest Park Guess what? Green Timbers is known as the birthplace of reforestation in BC. It was once home to towering 200-foot tall trees, attracting visitors from all around. Despite public protest, the area was clear-cut in 1929. Replanting efforts began almost immediately making it BC's first forest plantation. In 1988 and 1996, residents of Surrey voted in favour of having areas of Green Timbers designated as an urban forest, ensuring its protection. The Green Timbers Heritage Society helped raise awareness, and continue to steward the park today. The park is made up of various habitats; wetlands, meadows, a marsh, and a lake are all nestled within a second growth forest. From osprey flying high above the lake and garter snakes slithering through the meadow, to Pacific tree frogs singing in the wetland and owls hooting from the trees – you can see and hear nature all around you! Start by visiting the lake for a great place to relax, bird-watch, or go fishing. It’s stocked several times a year with rainbow trout, and fishing is welcomed (provincial regulations apply). Continue your adventure through one of the many forested trails. As you walk, look for the large stumps that are reminders of the once towering trees that stood in this park and marvel at the beauty and diversity that is preserved for generations to come. Check out the newest trails in the northwest, including one that leads to a glacial erratic, a large “wandering rock” that was carried a long distance by glacial ice. Don’t forget to stop by the Surrey Nature Centre! The southeast section of the park is designated as an Environmentally Sensitive Area to protect its ecological value. There is no public access.

14600 block – 100 Avenue

TS 6 41 Y E L L O W A R U M

TS 5 41

TS 841

TS 1 41

TS 3 41

101 AVE

S A L M O N B E R R Y

101 AVE

Y E W

100A AVE

TS 4 41

T R I L L I U M

Lena Shaw Elementary School

M O S S

1 0 0 A V E

100 AVE

TS 0 41

D O U G L A S - F I R

Q u i b b l e C r

P I N E

Surrey Nature Centre

RCMP E Division Headquarters

B I R C H

H E M L O C K

S A L A L

GREENTIMBERS WAY

W I L L O W

Meadow

Green Timbers Lake C E D A R

96 AVE

9 6 A V E

C A S C A R A

HYDRO RIGHT-OF-WAY

Seasonal

*The park map shows Green Timbers Urban Forest and Green Timbers Park

Simon Cunningham Elementary School

TS 4 41

M A P L E

FRASER HWY

TS 8 41

Environmentally Sensitive Area

Surrey College

TS 0 41

92 AVE

92 AVE

Scale 0

200

400m

20

Surrey Nature Centre at GreenTimbers Park Nestled in Green Timbers Park, the Surrey Nature Centre is a place for everyone to discover nature in the city. Stop by and explore! The Surrey Nature Centre offers school programs, day camps, public programs, events and more, all focused on outdoor fun and learning. Check out the Sky Room for self- guided activities in a cozy, nature-themed space. There are lots of fun things to do here. Build a giant bird’s nest in the pole forest, or peek into the seasonal pond. Take a walk through the arboretum, a living collection of over 75 species of native and exotic trees. Some of them are over 100 years old! Explore the forested trails and try to spot wildlife that make this their home. For more information, please call 604-502-6065 or visit surrey.ca/naturecentre .

14225 GreenTimbersWay

Trail continues to Green

Timbers Lake

96 AVE

GREENTIMBERS WAY

RCMP E Division Headquarters Jim Pattison Q u i b b l e C r

Grove Inaugural Forest

Heritage

Exhibition

Surrey

Nature Centre

Main Building

Lehmann

Arboretum

0 50 100m

FRASER HWY

GREENTIMBERS WAY

Outpatient Care

& Surgery Centre

Scale

22

140 ST

Hazelnut Meadows Community Park This park owes its name to the grove of hazelnut trees located in the grassy field near 142 Street, a remnant of an orchard planted by settler James Marsh in the early 1900s. Early timber operators logged this area, like much of Surrey, up until the 1930s. Replanting activities historically focused on the “Big Three” trees of the Pacific Northwest – Western redcedar, Douglas-fir and Western hemlock. These evergreen trees once blanketed all of Surrey. Bigleaf maples, whose trunks are often covered in moss and other plants, are another prominent tree in the park. You’ll also find an open meadow with willow and oak trees – a perfect place for a picnic. Looking for a quick escape into nature but are limited on time? Hazelnut Meadows Community Park is a great choice – the 1.6 km of nature trails take about 30 minutes to walk. In the southwest portion of the park you’ll find the playgrounds, basketball and ball hockey courts, a community garden, and multiple picnic shelters. Bring your friends and family out to play. In recent years, students and volunteers have been actively removing invasive plants and planting native trees and shrubs to take their place. These stewardship efforts have helped to restore forest habitat in the park. Can you see any evidence of their work? Contact Stewardship@surrey.ca to get involved.

14069 – 68 Avenue

69A AVE

69 AVE

142 ST

142 ST

68 AVE

70 AVE

141A ST

HazelnutTrees

Georges Vanier

Elementary School

141 ST

Community Garden

140A ST

Basketball Court

70 AVE

140 ST

140 ST

0 50 100m

68 AVE

7 0 A V E

Scale

24

Hi-Knoll Park Hi-Knoll Park was given to the people of Surrey by Doris Kathleen Skelton in 1974. She loved the land so much that she passed it on for us to explore and appreciate long into the future. North of the Colebrook Road parking lot is a meadow set along the swampy banks of the Nicomekl River. Here you may come across Mallard ducks with their broods of ducklings or swallows swooping for insects in the sun. Try to spot other animals hiding in the tall grass. South of Colebrook Road is a wooded area with winding trails. You may catch a glimpse of songbirds or a Pileated Woodpecker; its large size, bright red head, and loud cackling help to identify it. In the spring, the forest floor is carpeted with wildflowers, and trees are bursting with new growth. Hi-Knoll Park is one of the few places in the Lower Mainland to find the beautiful pink fawn lily, likely named for the white markings on its leaves, resembling those of a fawn. This wildflower’s delicate blossoms are increasingly rare in the shady wooded areas – please don’t pick them! Follow the trails over Anderson Creek, a salmon-bearing stream. Please note: during the rainy season, the entire area north of the Nicomekl bridge may be inaccessible due to flooding.

19569 Colebrook Road

C A N A D I A N P A C I F I C R A I L W A Y

McLellan Substation

M c L e l l a n C r

1 9 2 S T F G E

Meadow

Seasonal Flood Zone

N i c o m e k l R i v e r

192 ST

A n d e r s o n C r

Meadow

5 0 A A V E

C O L E B R O O K R D

49 AVE

A n d e r s o n C r

196 ST

192 ST

48 AVE

48 AVE

Scale 0

100

200m

26

Invergarry Park Over 100 years ago, Surrey began consolidating land for the conservation of the Bon Accord ravine and creek system which led to the creation of Invergarry Park. The creeks that pass through the park (Bon Accord Creek and Wallace Creek) provide important fish habitat. Riparian areas (those bordering streams, lakes and wetlands) provide shade, shelter from predators, and food for the insects that fish depend on. Today, the park protects significant natural forest and riparian creek habitat. The park’s walking trails lead up and down through the forest, giving you unique perspectives from above the forest floor. Throughout the park, large staircases lead you into the forest below. Look up for a chance to spot eagles and other birds in the treetops. Can you see any nests? As you walk the trails, take a look for the large Devil’s club leaves or yew trees; both are rare to find in Surrey. Both of these plants have played important roles in medicine – a pharmacy in the forest! This local treasure is also the location of one of the Lower Mainland’s premier mountain bike parks. It offers a range of trails for various skill levels and ages, including some of Surrey’s most expert terrain. A small gravel parking lot is at Wallace Drive and Surrey Road. Street parking is available at various access points to the park including 114 Avenue, Currie Drive, and Gladstone Drive.

11297 Surrey Road

H W Y 1 7 ( S O U T H F R A S E R P E R I M E T E R R D )

1 1 6 A A V E

Iqra Islamic School

K I N G R D

WELLINGTON DR

S T A N D R E W S D R W E L L I N G T O N D R

C U R R I E D R

McBRIDE DR

115 AVE

114A AVE

CRES

BEDFORD DR

114 AVE

144A ST

W A L L A C E D R

Bike Park

S U R R E Y R D R O X B U R G H R D

W a l l a c e C r

GROSVENOR RD

C U R R I E D R

B o n A c c o r d C r

G L A D S T O N E D R

112 AVE

M E L R O S E D R

111A AVE

K I N D E R S L E Y D R

C A L E D O N I A D R

Ellendale Elementary School

146 ST

P A R K D R

110A AVE

148 ST

110 AVE

110 AVE

110 AVE

Scale

0

100 200m

144 ST

143A ST

28

Mud Bay Park Situated along the shore of Boundary Bay, Mud Bay Park offers excellent opportunities for bird-watching. Shoreline trails lead you past a variety of habitats supporting hundreds of different types of birds, mammals and marine creatures. The combination of mud flats, eelgrass beds, salt marshes, meadow and ocean creates an ideal mix of wildlife habitat. Did you know that eelgrass beds and mud flats are among the most productive ecosystems in the world? At Mud Bay Park, the eelgrass beds and mud flats are an important stopover for migrating birds in need of food. The park is located along the Pacific Flyway, an aerial “highway” for birds flying between Alaska and the Canadian Arctic to Central and South America. Mud Bay provides a buffet of food sources including whelks, worms, clams, and mussels. Thousands of birds visit, nest and live in the park. During your visit, take a break on one of the many benches and try to spot some of the reclusive shorebirds not far from the shore. Enjoy ocean views while walking the park's trails. A 2.5-km loop trail takes you along the park’s perimeter on a flat, wide trail. For a longer walk or bike ride, follow the dyke trail west into Delta and to Boundary Bay Regional Park. Please note that the shoreline trails are closed to dogs, bikes, and horses from fall to early spring each year to minimize disturbance to migratory birds.

13030 – 48 Avenue (From Colebrook Road, turn south onto 127A Street, then east onto Railway Road which leads to the parking lot)

HWY 99

R A I L W A Y R D

B U R L I N G T O N N O R T H E R N R A I L W A Y

Environmentally Sensitive Area

M u d B a y

1 2 7 A S T

COLEBROOK RD

0 100 200m

125A ST

HWY 99

Scale

30

Trail continues

to Boundary Bay Regional Park

Redwood Park Redwood Park offers a quiet escape into the trees. This magnificent arboretum of over 50 different species of trees and five towering groves was started by twin brothers David and Peter Brown in 1893 – what a legacy! It’s hard to imagine that less than 150 years ago this area had been completely logged. The twins planted diverse trees from North America, Asia, South America, and Europe, including many fruit and nut trees. Today, a replica of the treehouse they lived in stands in the centre of the park. The park gets its name from the many redwood trees planted here. The red-brown giants that you see are giant sequoias, typically found in western California and famous for growing to be some of the largest trees in the world! Can you find the biggest giant sequoia in the park? It is estimated to be 110 years old – only a sapling compared to its 3500-year- old relatives in California! Whether you are looking to have a picnic in a forest setting, play at an all-access playground, or simply wander amongst the trees, Redwood Park is the place to do it. Trails wind through forest, meadows and groves of trees. The trees are ever-changing with the seasons, so visit year-round and watch as the greens turn to gold and then back again. If you are looking for a more rugged trail experience, follow the trails down the slope in the southern portion of the park.

17900 – 20 Avenue

20 AVE

20 AVE

176 ST

180 ST

Meadow

19A AVE

Tree House

R E D W O O D D R

1 8 A V E

Meadow

T h o m s o n C r

HIGHWAY 15

Scale 0

100

200m

177 ST

16 AVE

16 AVE

32

Semiahmoo Trail Semiahmoo Trail is a significant historical route that was used by Indigenous peoples and early settlers. In 1874, the “Semiahmoo Road” spanned 40 km from NewWestminster to the settlement of Semiahmoo (now Blaine, Washington). It was one of the first “roads” in Surrey – originally only accommodating trail walkers, horses, and wagons. Today, Semiahmoo Trail is made up of a combination of nature trails, paved paths, and roads, and provides residents with a peaceful place to walk. You can walk the trail in its entirety or just a portion. Animals also use the Trail as a corridor to travel between Sunnyside Acres Urban Forest and the Nicomekl River. Semiahmoo Trail runs through forest, and past ponds, creeks, and other small green spaces along the way. Watch for birds of prey up above, and listen for the chorus of our Pacific tree frog. Make sure to check out the huge Douglas-fir tree near the 22 Avenue entrance; it’s a designated Heritage Tree and a testament to the trees that stood here long ago. One of the easiest access points to Semiahmoo Trail is at the corner of 148 Street and 28 Avenue, near the pedestrian overpass. Please note there is no formal parking lot for Semiahmoo Trail.

3065 SemiahmooTrail or 28 Avenue off 148 Street

N i c o m e k l R i v e r

Trail continues

C R E S C E N T R D

HWY 99

KING GEORGE HWY

34 AVE

152 ST

144 ST

32B AVE

3 2 A A V E

32 AVE

148 ST

Semiahmoo Trail Park

Street Parking

148 ST

Semiahmoo Trail Pedestrian Overpass

28 AVE

150 ST

Sunnyside Acres Urban Forest

26 AVE

26 AVE

149 ST 25A AVE

24A AVE

144 ST

24 AVE

23A AVE

150B ST

150 ST

22 AVE

152 ST

22 AVE

148 ST

Scale 0

200

400

600m

1 5 0 A S T

21 AVE

151A ST

20 AVE

34

Sunnyside Acres Urban Forest Park Sunnyside Acres was one of the first designated urban forest parks in Canada, thanks to Surrey residents voting to protect it in 1988. Once successful, an inspired group of residents established the Sunnyside Acres Heritage Society, an organization dedicated to the ongoing preservation of the forest. Today, they continue to work closely with Surrey Parks to protect, promote and enhance this urban forest. After it was logged in the early 1900s, the forest was left to regenerate on its own, resulting in a diverse community of plants and animals. From the colourful vine maples in fall to the rare rattlesnake plantain orchid in summer, there are special sights to see in every season! Sunnyside Acres is home to black- tailed deer, coyotes, Douglas squirrels and many different birds. A large network of trails, including several loop trails, is used by visitors and wildlife alike. Trails wind their way across boardwalks, past streams and through thick forest understory. There is a trail for everyone, from the Wally Ross universal access trail (0.8 km) to more rugged nature trails such as the Douglas-fir and Moss trails. South of 24 Avenue, there are more walking trails and forested bike trails that border South Surrey Athletic Park’s many amenities. Check out the soccer fields, a spray park, an ice arena, a skate park, and a recreation centre.

14500 block 24 Avenue

Continues to SemiahmooTrail

Semiahmoo Trail Pedestrian Overpass

28 AVE

146 ST

28 AVE

V I N E M A P L E

N O R T H C R E S T D R

C H I C K A D E E L O O P

144 ST

Continues to SemiahmooTrail

27 AVE

148 ST

M O S S C H I C K A D E E L O O P

M A P L E

D O U G L A S - F I R

26 AVE

C H I C K A D E E L O O P

26 AVE

Universal Access Trails

25A AVE

1 4 8 A S T

A L D E R G R O V E

S A L A L

T R I L L I U M

W A L L Y R O S S

24A AVE

F E R N

144 ST

24 AVE

24 AVE

145 ST

Softball City

23 AVE

Bike Park

Environmentally Sensitive Area

22 AVE

Ice Arena

Tennis Courts

148A ST

21A AVE

21 AVE

Sports Fields

148 ST

20 AVE

20 AVE

South Surrey Recreation and Arts Centre

1 4 3 A S T

Scale 0

144 ST

200

400m

36

Surrey Lake Park Did you know that Surrey Lake is a human-made lake? The lake helps with flood control, and varies in size between ten to twenty acres depending on the time of year and the amount of rainfall – that’s the equivalent of up to seven football fields! It also provides habitat for amphibians, reptiles, fish, birds and mammals. All of the fish in this lake have found their own way here from Bear Creek. In order to protect this sensitive habitat, please note that dogs and water sports (including fishing and boating) are not permitted in the lake. Surrey Lake Park is a great place to bird-watch. Birds of all sizes are drawn to the park’s habitats to find food, shelter and water. On a typical day you might see a Bald Eagle soaring above or a Marsh Wren perched on the swaying bulrushes with its characteristic tail sticking straight up. Relax at one of the benches by the lake to see all of the birds in action! If you’re lucky, you might even see an eagle swoop down to the lake to grab a fresh catch. The 2-km out-and-back loop from the parking lot is a combination of flat trails and gradual hills. For a shorter walk stick to the trail along the lake. Bring binoculars as you explore the lakeside, meadow, wetland, and forest!

7500 – 152 Street (park must be accessed from northbound 152 Street)

Fleetwood

Substation

156 ST

B e a r C r e e k

0 100 200m

Scale

Wetland

Surrey Lake

B e a r C r e e k

Eaglequest Golf

72 AVE

152 ST

152 ST

38

"Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt."

90366

surrey.ca/parks

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